Crete tourist guide

The best Polish website dedicated to the Greek island Crete and to a small extent of continental Greece. You will find useful information related to visiting Crete that goes beyond the offer of optional tours. On the website you will also find descriptions of the most interesting places that we visited by visiting this largest Greek island. The content complements the current news, photographs and recipes of Greek cuisine.

Fresh herbs in Greek cuisine

Greek cuisine is unique. Its health aspects are determined by the complementary action of the ingredients of individual dishes and its support on natural products with the exclusion of those processed with chemical additives. Greeks enrich their food additionally with herbs, both in dried and fresh form. Of the latter, oregano, mint, rosemary and thyme land very often on the Greek plate. Equally often in this role are ordinary green plants rich in antioxidant ingredients such as parsley or dill.

It is herbs added alone or in compositions that add this unique accent to simple Greek dishes. Those growing in Greece are unique due to the unique climate: a large number of sunny days throughout the year, soil, sea climate. Some of the herbs grow only here ...

The Greek tradition of using herbs dates back many centuries, when it was used for medical purposes, such as oregano, or religious. Some of the herbs are associated with stories of characters known from Greek mythology. Today, being in Crete, it's impossible to miss roadside wild, wild herbs that smell clearly in the air, as well as herbs grown in home gardens and pots.

Thyme in Crete

What herbs are the most popular? Creating such a list will be difficult, but let's try ...

Oregano (Rigani, ρίγανη) - is the most popular herb used in Greece, literally for all dishes: meat, fish, cheese, vegetables, as well as marinades, sauces and salads. Healing properties are also known. In Crete, you can buy a special variety of wild oregano growing high in the mountains and harvested by hand. According to Greek mythology, the sweet-spicy scent of this plant was created by Aphrodite as a symbol of happiness.

Basil (Vasilikos, βασιλικός) - popular in principle since recently in Greece, although known since antiquity and recommended by ancient physicists: Hippocrates and Pliny. Both fresh and dried are used. Its various varieties are used for salads, vegetables and cooked dishes.

Bay leaf (Daphni, δάφνη) - similarly to us, it is usually dried for soups, stewed meat or fish. Its Greek name comes from mythology from the name of the nymph Daphne .

Marjoram (Mantzourana, μαντζουράνα) used rather dried for seasoning lamb, beef and other meats, sausages, tomato dishes. The ancients attributed to him the healing action, they planted on the graves of relatives in the conviction that he would provide eternal peace and happiness, but they also made wedding wreaths for young couples as a symbol of love and happiness.

Parsley (Maïdanos, μαϊντανός) used practically everywhere where it can be added: for soups, stews, meat, fish, seafood, sauces, legumes.

Fennel (Anithos, άνηθος) - already known in ancient Greece and used as a medicinal plant. Currently, both leaves and seeds are used to season marinades, fish, meats, salads, omelettes and legumes. You can find it in dolmades, bread and even in some cakes.

Rosemary (Thentrolivano, δεντρολίβανο) - often seen in the form of perennial rather tall shrubs with woody stems. It is most often used for seasoning lamb, chicken, baked potatoes or fish. Also met during baking. The most aromas are fresh twigs.

Rosemary

Mint (Dyosmos, δυόσμος) - who once ate even Greek meatballs knows that mint is the secret ingredient in the taste. In addition, the Greeks add mint commonly to salads, tomato sauces, cheese dishes, rice and meat. Also used as a well-known herbal tea. If it were not for Hades and his jealous wife Persephone, it would not be mint today. According to mythology, Hiden fell in love with Menthe , and his wife threw a nymph to trample her. Then Hades turned Menthe into a bush.

Purslane (Glistritha, γλιστρίδα) - very common in Greek cuisine. Fresh leaves can be found in lettuce (eg with yoghurt), also found in soups and some meat and fish dishes. Her leaves are preparing like spinach. In ancient Greece recommended by m.in. Hippocrates as a medicinal plant. Currently, for the owners of home gardens, it is rather a nuisance, because the purslane grows very invasively.

Sage (Faskomilo, φασκόμηλο) - usually added to meat but in small quantities. In Crete, it is used when smoking sausage or baking bread in a traditional wood-fired oven, into which sage twigs are put.

Thyme (Thymari, θυμάρι) is most often used in combination with other herbs, added to soups, stews and meats. Very popular thyme honeys are sold on Crete. In the mountainous areas of Crete thyme bushes are a frequent sight, because it grows in large clumps, most often with very woody stems.

Thyme and mint

Fennel Italian - fennel (Maratho, μάραθο) - with its aniseed scent it is used for meat and fish dishes, for goulash, vegetable dishes, seafood and cakes. Vegetable dishes give a characteristic flavor. The Greek name Maratho was given in remembrance of the Battle of Marathon in 490 BC, which took place in the fennel field.

Savory (Throubi, θρουμπί) - added to dishes from legumes, marinades, fish, vegetables and many other dishes. The thybra satureja variety has been known and used since antiquity. The name Thybra comes from the name of the village near Troja.

Estragon (Estrankón, εστραγκόν) - by the ancient Greeks used to relieve toothache, by the present for seasoning, for example, omelettes, or grilled chicken.

Herbs in Crete

Data publikacji:
Data modyfikacji:
Średnia: 4.5
Liczba ocen: 2
  • 0.5
  • 1.0
  • 1.5
  • 2.0
  • 2.5
  • 3.0
  • 3.5
  • 4.0
  • 4.5
  • 5.0
 
 
Oceniłeś na:
 
Kreta informacje 4.5 na 5 (0) liczba ocen 2
Wszystkie treści i zdjęcia występujące w serwisie są naszą własnością.
Wykorzystanie ich w dowolnej formie wymaga pisemnej zgody autorów.

Komentarze

Wypełnij poniższy formularz aby dodać komentarz

Nazwa użytkownika:

Adres e-mail:

Tytuł:

Treść:

Przepisz kod z obrazka:
Kod obrazka

Wpisanie prawidowego kodu oznacza zgodę na przetwarzanie danych w celu wyświetlania komentarza.
Kontakt Administratorem Danych Osobowych zgromadzonych na stronie możliwy jest pod adresem mailowym [email protected]

Zapisz komentarz
Zapisz komentarz

Inne strony tej kategorii

Feta (Φέτα)

Feta (Φέτα)

Since 2007, the name Feta is protected by international regulations and reserved exclusively for cheeses produced in specific regions of Greece using strictly defined ingredients based on the traditional method of production. Thanks to the regulations introduced in the EU, this name can no longer be used by producers from other EU countries producing "salted cheese in brine". Therefore, since then we can be sure that when buying feta we will reach for the original Greek product that will contain nothing but sheep's milk and possibly goat's, rennet and salt. In the composition of feta, we will not find preservatives or other "enriching" additives because the EU provisions clearly define the characteristics of feta. In addition, the Greeks themselves scrupulously and often control the companies that produce this cheese.

Greek oil versus the rest of the world

Greek oil versus the rest of the world

Greece is the third largest oil producer in the world after Spain and Italy with a market share of over ten percent in the global market. Seeing the many olive groves on Crete probably will not surprise you that less than 1/3 of the total production of Greek oil comes from this island. Similarly high, because almost 27% share only olive groves located on the Peloponnese.

About Cretan honey and its quality

About Cretan honey and its quality

Since 2000, the Institute of Mediterranean Agriculture in Chania has conducted regular research, the main purpose of which is to determine the quality of honey produced in Crete. Currently, the amount of honey examined has been increased to around 500 samples, the vast majority of which comes from Crete.

Booking.com

Polecamy:

Oliwa i kosmetyki organiczne Olivaloe

Najnowsze komentarze:

Jacek Jakobschy: Zapraszamy do Gdańska
Jola Ostraszewska: Kiedy Poznań ?
Artur Nowak: Mam to w dupie. Ja detalicznie i po kosztach kupuję oliwę z okolic Chani. Bo kocham Kretę. Na dobre i na złe
Ania Łuczyńska: Do zobaczenia jutro
Kinga Lademann: Dziś podobnie. 4,9..
Mariola Maj: Musisz☺
gość PiotrWie: Nie bardzo rozumiem czego w takim razie oczekują ci zainteresowani innymi trasami w okolicy - są szlaki, mapy, nawet czynne od wiosny do jesieni schronisko Kallerghi i schrony w Katsivelli i Rousies - jak ktoś jest zainteresowany to trzeba po prostu chodzić - i z roku na rok coraz więcej ludzi chodzi.
Aneta Okoniewska: Byłam na Krecie a do wąwozu Samaria nie dotarłam... muszę tam wrócić
Zofia Sokołowska: Byłam. Popłynęłam z kapitanem George z Sougii.
Ewa Szumowska: Albania, Grecja, co się dzieje
Janusz Safari: Ja nic nie poczułem
Kamil Juszczyk: Czyżby budzi się wulkan na Santorini. Oby nie, bo to by była wielka katastrofa. W sierpniu byłem na Santorini i taka stara babcia mówiła że dobrze że teraz odwiedzamy to miejsce bo niedługo może zniknąć pod wodą.
Ma Nickl: Rebecca Schmidt
Monika Zofia Koprowska-Ludwig: Na Santorini też trzeslo
Mariola Dudzinska: U nas w Hiraklionie oj trzeslo
Grzegorz Sprawka: Magdalena
Magdalena Mróz: Oj trzęsło nas trzęsło !!!
KIWI Travel: Super wiadomość! Brakowało takiego miejsca na Krecie!
Marianka Grzybowska: Jak nazywa sie to danie po grecku?
Martyna Zieba: Robert Braziewicz kolejny powod do powrotu
gość PiotrWie: Masowy turysta przylatuje czarterem i raczej z pakietem All. W sezonie od maja do końca wrześnie lata z Polski ok 20 samolotów na Kretę więc te przykładowe dwa w zimie przywiozłyby 10% turystów z sezonu. I byliby to inni turyści - bardziej świadomi po co przylecieli - zwiedzać a nie jeść od rana do wieczora i pić alkohol nad basenem. (...)
Joanna Czapla: Kreta nie jest i mam nadzieje nigdy nie będzie gotowa do przyjęcia masowej ilości turystów zimą. Prawda jest taka że tanie linie latają tutaj z PL (i nie tylko) już od kwietnia - do końca października. Gdyby masowa turystyka rozwinęła się również w Listopadzie, Grudniu, Styczniu, Lutym i Marcu wtedy Kteta przestała by być Kretą. (...)
gość PiotrWie: My byliśmy co prawda na początku listopada ale to już sezon zimowy na Cyprze - było całkiem sporo turystów ale tam są całą zimę loty bezpośrednie - gdyby były na Kretę też by ludzie latali - oprócz plaż na Krecie są góry w dużych ilościach i różnych stopniach trudności i wysokości - w sityjskich gdzie też jest gdzie pochodzić śnieg leży czasem tylko kilka - kilkanaście dni, zabytki można zwiedzać zdecydowanie ... (...)
Nikos Falirakis: Pytanie godne starożytnych filozofów ...
Wojtek Arciszewski: Każde wejście do wody ma kosztować 1 euro, z sikaniem 2 euro

Ciekawe miejsca na Krecie

CRETE Copyright © 2009-19 Linki | Kontakt